‘Trees for Bees’

We are putting tiogether a map of the apple and other fruit trees around Dorchester. We hope this map will show if the bees can find a way across the town in spring by flying from one source of nectar to another.

This map shows the apple and other fruit trees we have found in public green spaces in Dorchester up to 30 April 2020.

As you will see, there are still many gaps in the network of fruit trees around the town. A more detailed, zoomable map can be found here.

If you know of any fruit trees missing from these maps, please use the ‘Comments’ box below to let us know of these trees so we can add them to the map.

Likewise if you know of any locations where more fruit trees could be planted, please send us details using the ‘Comments’ box. Thank you.

4 thoughts on “‘Trees for Bees’

  • May 16, 2020 at 9:23 am
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    Hi Richard
    What a fabulous project!
    For the map, we have a really interesting collection of more unusual, traditional fruit trees on the lawns at the front of Thomas Hardye School (DT1 2ET). There are medlars, quinces, crabapples and walnuts. I’ve always thought what inspired choices these species are for the grounds of a public building.

    Reply
    • May 16, 2020 at 4:47 pm
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      Many thanks Tim. Great to hear about the fruit trees at Thomas Hardye School, I will find a way to add them to the map in the next few days.

      Reply
  • May 17, 2020 at 11:54 am
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    We have an old apple tree overwhelmed with honeysuckle in the back garden of 24 Victoria Rd, DT11SB, but next door at No 23, is a lovely mature cooking apple tree which our adult blue tits rely on to feed their nestlings.
    The overgrown garden at 6 Albert Rd (Opp Agincare & the Borough Gardens, by the junction of Albert Rd & Cornwall Rd) certainly has one old apple tree & another fruit tree. I’m afraid I can’t recollect from memory whether it is an apple or a pear but I referred to them as important potential pollinators in a response to a planning application in April 2019.
    It would be fascinating to know where the hives are – my husband & I have often wondered. I think there may be hives at Transition Town Dorchester site at Poundbury? Do you have any at the Community Orchard at the rear of Monmouth Rd?

    Reply
    • May 17, 2020 at 6:48 pm
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      Many thanks, Linda, for adding some fruit trees to our map. As they in private gardens, I think the best thing will be to add another layer to our map for the fruit trees that are not in public open spaces.

      You raise an interesting point regarding the location of hives. I will see what we can find out.

      Reply

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